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Google has eliminated brainteasers from their interview questions!


You've probably seen these fabled interview questions around on the Internet. Questions like: • How many golf balls can you fit into a school bus? • How much would you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle? • Why are manhole covers round? • How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?

These questions have long been thought to give great insight on how the mind of a candidate works. However, after years of using them, Google has concluded that they are a complete waste of time. Google says that the questions "don't predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart."

Google has now switched to using behavioral interviews, in which a candidate talks about their life experiences. They say that this gives them more useful information, because it shows how they interacted in a real-world situation and what kind of stuff they think is difficult.

(Source)

etoduarte submitted this to OMG Facts

Baby chicks are smarter than baby humans!


Despite that Humans are the most intelligent animals on Earth, we still get our butts kicked in the baby department. A new study found that baby chickens have many cognitive skills that human babies don’t.

For example, in a test where chicks could get more food if they waited longer to eat, 93% of chicks exhibited self-control. Human babies don't typically develop this skill until age 4. Chicks also seem to have an instinctive understanding of structural engineering: They like structurally sound cubes more than ones that are less structurally sound.

Chicks also have better number skills. When offered a group of eggs, chicks always picked the larger group, even when researchers tried to trick them by moving eggs around.

(Source)

etoduarte submitted this to OMG Facts

Snails in Ireland reveal where its humans came from!


It might sound strange. How can a snail tell the Irish people who their ancestors were? Well, researchers have recently found that garden snails in Ireland are genetically different from the ones found in Britain. They are, however, remarkably similar to snails found in Southern France and Northern Spain today.

How did they make the trip? Scientists don't believe that snails could have migrated all the way to Ireland. No, they think they were either brought by humans who migrated from the Iberian peninsula to Ireland. This leads credence to the theory that the Irish have little genetic links to the British.

(Source)

etoduarte submitted this to OMG Facts

Scientists just discovered a new human body part!


And you thought we knew everything we could know about body parts. Thanks to new technology, scientists have discovered that our eyes' corneas don't have 5 layers, as previously believed, but rather 6.

The new layer, called Dua's Layer is only 15 microns thick. If that doesn't mean much to you, consider that this layer is smaller than beach sand and mist. The cornea itself is only 500 microns thick, but is incredibly tough and strong.

The new discovery will lead to entire ophthalmology textbooks being rewritten, as well as probably better surgical treatments for certain problems that are caused by the tearing of this previously unknown layer.

(Source)

etoduarte submitted this to OMG Facts

Tiger moths can block a bat's sonar!


The tiger moth's biggest predators are bats. It makes sense, then, that they are engaged in an evolutionary race for their survival. The tiger moth has developed a keen ear for sonar signals that bats emit, which helps them avoid being eaten.

But their abilities don't stop there. Tiger moths can also release 4,500 clicks per second. What this does is it jams a bat's sonar ability, and makes them hard to find through echolocation. The tiger moth's technique works much like a jammer can block a phone signal, and is 93% effective in making bats miss them.

(Source)